Pages

Friday, 2 October 2015

Six-year-old gets plastic surgery for his 'elf ears' after he was bullied by his classmates in the first grade


A six-year-old boy from Utah who was called 'elf ears' because his ears stuck out got plastic surgery this month to put the teasing to an end.
They say, 'that I look like an elf and I have weird ears', first grader Gage Berger told Inside Edition on Monday.
'I just don't want to be made fun of,' he said with his eyes downcast.

Gage's parents Tim and Kallie told Inside Edition they feared the bullying could lead to lasting psychological trauma and that their son would often hold his ears back in the mirror to see what he looked like.

Tim and Kallie said they decided to opt for the two hour surgery at the hands of facial plastic surgeon, Dr Steven Mobley, in Salt Lake City.
Dr Mobley used an ear carved in wood to explain the surgery to Gage so that he would not be afraid. He demonstrated how he would give Gage the inner circle of the ear by sewing it into the right shape and pinning it back.

Gage also chose to bring along his stuffed tiger with a green bandage around his head to the surgery. Gage said that the tiger was also getting his ears pinned back.
'He just gets really down on himself and he thinks, "I’m not good enough,"' the mother told Inside Edition of why she chose to get the surgery.
The New York Daily News spoke with Dr Tracy Pfeifer, a plastic surgeon, who specializes in facial plastic surgery who said that it is common for children to get ear surgery at a young age.
Relatively simple: The procedure lasted just two hours and is a common surgery for young children

Relatively simple: The procedure lasted just two hours and is a common surgery for young children
The procedure: Dr Mobley used an ear carved in wood to explain the surgery to Gage so that he would not be afraid. He demonstrated how he would give Gage the inner circle of the ear by sewing it (pictured) into the right shape and pinning it back

The procedure: Dr Mobley used an ear carved in wood to explain the surgery to Gage so that he would not be afraid. He demonstrated how he would give Gage the inner circle of the ear by sewing it (pictured) into the right shape and pinning it back
'The surgery is relatively simple and it is life-changing in a positive way for these young children,' she said.

'While in an ideal world children would not be bullied, plastic surgeons know all too well that children with abnormal looking ears are bullied and made fun of in school and this has a tremendous negative impact on their self-esteem,' she added.
According the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, over 63,000 cosmetic procedures on noses, ears, and overly large breasts were performed on teens ages 13 to 19 in the U.S.
'It's harder to make friends so they become socially stunted. They are also perceived as less intelligent by peers and even adults,' said Steven J. Pearlman, MD, a facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon.
'If you look at cartoons depicting individuals of lesser intelligence, they are often drawn with big, protruding ears,' he told The New York Daily News.

'By the age of six, the child is old enough to understand they are being bullied and can participate in the decision for surgery.'
Child psychologist Karen Caraballo warned families against plastic surgery for their children.
'It is concerning to use plastic surgery to stop bullying,' said Dr Caraballo.
'There should be zero tolerance for bullying. Bullying can threaten students' physical and emotional safety at school and can negatively impact their ability to learn, socialize and deeply impact their mental health,' she added.
Happy with results: Gage smiled from ear to ear when he looked at himself in the mirror after the surgery

Happy with results: Gage smiled from ear to ear when he looked at himself in the mirror after the surgery


No comments:

Post a comment