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Wednesday, 12 September 2018

Man Given A Pioneering £50,000 'Bionic Penis' After Being Born Without The Organ FINALLY Has Sex Aged 45 (And Is Rather Pleased With His 'Ridiculously Big' New Manhood)

Caterer given a 'bionic penis' after being born without the organ finally has sex aged 45
A man born without a penis has lost his virginity aged 45 thanks to a bionic manhood made from his own skin. Andrew Wardle, from Manchester, had a £50,000 penile implant operation at University College Hospital London in June - but had to wait six weeks before he could have sex for the first time. After activating a button in his groin to pump up his 'ridiculously big' new penis, he lost his virginity to his girlfriend of six years Fedra Fabian as they prepared for a romantic getaway to Amsterdam. 

He said the sex lasted for about half an hour and felt 'fantastic'. Talking about his new manhood, he added: 'I'm so pleased with it.' Twenty-eight-year-old Fedra, from Hungary, said the sex was 'amazing' and Andrew's penis looks normal despite being inflated with saline fluid to make it erect. She added: 'It's fantastic - no need to worry about viagra or getting old. He can do it when he's drunk too!'

A diagram shows how Andrew's bionic penis is taken from skin from his forearm and a vein in his leg. It is then rolled into the shape of a manhood and attached. Inside the penis is a penile implant which pumps saline fluid into the cylinder making the penis erect for intercourse 

'Two days before we went away, it just happened,' he told The Sun. 'It was nice and natural — and that's how I wanted it to be.' 

He said the sex lasted for about half an hour and felt 'fantastic'. Talking about his new manhood, he added: 'I'm so pleased with it.' 

Twenty-eight-year-old Fedra, from Hungary, said the sex was 'amazing' and Andrew's penis looks normal despite being inflated with saline fluid to make it erect.

She added: 'It's fantastic - no need to worry about viagra or getting old. He can do it when he's drunk too!'

The bionic penis is fully rigged up to Andrew's testicles, meaning it's possible for the couple to have children. 
In the final stage of his £50,000 penile implant surgery he was fitted with a pump that will give him an erection at the push of a button (pictured)In a remarkable operation, doctors built his new penis from the skin, muscles and nerves in Andrew's left arm, pictured, and a vein in his leg
In a remarkable operation, doctors built his new penis from the skin, muscles and nerves in Andrew's left arm, left, and a vein in his leg. In the final stage of his £50,000 penile implant surgery he was fitted with a pump that will give him an erection at the push of a button, right

The caterer, who was born with a condition called bladder exstrophy, said he will take a fertility test to see if they can conceive and they will adopt if he can't.

After the operation in June, Andrew told MailOnline: 'I'm very excited that I can move on now. But I think having sex for the first time is more of a big deal for everyone else than it is for me.

'I've spent 44 years without a penis and I've coped with not having sex for all that time. It will take me a while to get in the swing of things. 

'Of course, I'm looking forward to it. But, for me, it's not the be-all-and-end-all. It's a by-product of the operation. It will enable me to feel part of society. 

He went on: 'I'm feeling good because they've given me painkillers but I'm sure I will feel a bit sore later on. I do feel different. I'm very aware there's some robotics inside me but it feels a part of me now. I'm very aware that I am half-human half-robot at the moment. I'm like the bionic man. I will even be able to perform if I am drunk.' 

Andrew, from Manchester was born with bladder exstrophy, a rare birth defect that means the organ formed on the outside of his body. Although he has one testicle, the one-in-20-million condition meant Andrew was born without a penis. 

As a child he underwent a surgical procedure to create an artificial opening known as a stoma in his urinary system. He had countless operations to build a tube from his bladder so he could pass water normally and suffered from kidney problems. 

His rare birth defect led Andrew to attempt suicide but in 2012 he was given hope after being referred to Dan Wood, a consultant urologist at UCLH in London 

He said: 'My GP knew about my depression and suicide attempts. She told me: 'You can't live like this'.


Fedra and Andrew, pictured before his final operation, will have to wait for six weeks before they can have sex for the first time. On Friday Andrew had a pump fitted into his penis and he will have an erection for the next ten days before his implant is deflated

'I thought: 'I've heard all this before,' but she actually got in touch with Mr Wood and said: 'I've got a guy who wants to meet you.'

'I went down to London and I was so skint I had to sleep on the streets. But it was worth it.

'Until then everybody had said: 'I can't do anything.' But he said: 'I can build you a new bladder and my friend can build you a penis.'

'It took me the whole journey home to understand what he meant. I thought: 'I've been in every hospital in the country and they've never said this before'.' 

Andrew had his first operation to remove his urostomy bag – his urine had been diverted into a specially-converted stoma – in February 2014.

He now has a Mitrofanoff – or catheter – to enable him to go to the lavatory. 'I think that saved my life more than my penis,' he said.

'The urostomy was the worst thing. I didn't feel human, but I thought I was stuck with it.

'Now I have freedom. I'm never busting for the toilet any more. I find it better than a normal bladder.' 

However, his new bladder did cause complications. 'The complete procedure was supposed to take two years,' he said, 'but in the end it was five years. 

'They found a tiny pin prick in my abdomen, which slowed things down, which could have got infected. 

'It caused a huge delay but there was nothing I could do about it because there was nowhere else I could go. 


'They looked at operating, but it would have meant working around work they had already done so in the end they decided to avoid it.' 

Via - Dailymail

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