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Friday, 8 December 2017

Justice Ademola Resigns As Federal High Court Judge


Justice Adeniyi Ademola, one of the eight superior court judges that were arrested after a sting operation conducted in October last year by the Department of State Service (DSS), has voluntarily retired from the Federal High Court bench.

Vanguard reports that the Judge tendered his resignation letter to the National Judicial Council (NJC) late in the evening on Wednesday after he had presided over several cases, four of which were criminal matters.


Although there was no detail as to his sudden decision to voluntarily bow out of the bench, the embattled judge was however quoted to have cited happenings in the judicial sector as the cardinal reason behind his action.

His decision came a day after the NJC, which is headed by the Chief Justice of Nigeria (CJN), Justice Walter Onnoghen, met in Abuja.

The NJC which is expected to deliberate on its recent controversial recommendation for the elevation of 14 new Justices for the Court of Appeal, had adjourned to conclude its meeting on Thursday.

It was however not clear if the case of Justice Ademola was discussed by the Council as the NJC is currently before the Court of Appeal in Abuja to challenge an order restraining it from investigating corruption allegation against Justice Ademola.

The order was contained in a judgment that was delivered by Justice John Tsoho of the same high court where Ademola is currently serving over a petition that was filed by Hon. Jenkins Duvie Giane Gwede but subsequently withdrawn.

Justice Tsoho maintained that the NJC could no longer open investigation into the matter or invite Ademola to prove his innocence to a petition that was voluntarily withdrawn by the petitioner since 2016.

However, NJC, in the appeal it filed alongside three members of its investigative panel- Justice Umar Abdullahi (retd), Justice Babatunde Adejumo and Mrs. Rakiya Ibrahim – raised 10 grounds it urged the appellate court to consider and set aside the verdict.

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