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Friday, 22 December 2017

Britain Will Get Its Traditional Dark Blue Passport Back In 2019 As EU-Approved Burgundy Document Brought In 30- Years Ago Is Set To Be Scrapped After Brexit

Post-Brexit Britain will get its dark blue passport back
The traditional blue British passport will make a return after Brexit in a move to reclaim our 'national identity'. The European Union-approved burgundy document was controversially introduced in 1988. But the Home Office has confirmed it will be scrapped when we leave on March 29, 2019. They will gradually be phased out so those with existing passports will not have to change them until they expire.


The European Union-approved burgundy document was controversially introduced in 1988.
But the Home Office has confirmed it will be scrapped when we leave on March 29, 2019.
They will gradually be phased out so those with existing passports will not have to change them until they expire.


Burgundy-coloured new passports will still be issued without any EU insignia on them until the current passport contract expires five months after Brexit.
The new blue and gold travel documents will be issued to those renewing or applying for a new passport from October 2019.
Making the announcement, immigration Minister Brandon Lewis said it was a change to symbolise our sovereignty.
He said: 'Leaving the EU gives us a unique opportunity to restore our national identity and forge a new path for ourselves in the world.'
The traditional blue British passport (left) will make a return after Brexit in a move to reclaim our ‘national identity’
The traditional blue British passport (left) will make a return after Brexit in a move to reclaim our 'national identity'
He added: 'That is why I am delighted to announce that the British passport will be returning to the iconic blue and gold design after we have left the European Union in 2019.
'It will also be one of the most secure travel documents in the world, with a raft of new security measures to protect against fraud and forgery.'


The design will feature the Queen's 'Dieu et Mon Droit' crest on its front in gold, instead of EU markings, while the pages inside will be decorated with patriotic UK scenes.
Costing £72.50 - the same as current passports, they will feature improved security features to protect against forgery, including a biometric microchip.
Immigration Minister Brandon Lewis said the change symbolised our sovereignty
Immigration Minister Brandon Lewis said the change symbolised our sovereignty
The current paper-based picture page will be replaced with a new, super-strength plastic polycarbonate material that will be more difficult to alter.
The 'Old Blue' passport was introduced in 1920, but in 1981 Brussels demanded all member states should have a 'European' passport within four years.
In 2000 the UK fought off a plan to remove the Queen's crest from the passport and possibly introduce the 12-star EU logo on its cover.
And in 2007, Brussels tried to remove the phrase 'Her Britannic Majesty' from the documents.
There have been numerous calls for the new passport to return to the dark blue colour after Brexit.
Mr Lewis told the Sun: 'One of the most iconic things about being British is having a British passport.
'I recognise that for many people who voted in that referendum, they want to see things that are different. One of the most iconic things about being British is having a British passport.
'So from the first day we leave, new passports will look different and within five months they will be very different, because they will be dark blue again.'


The cabinet minister added: 'We wanted to return to the dark blue passport because we recognise the string attachment people had to it.'
Tory MP Michael Fabricant said that the passports were going to have to be updated to remove the 'Citizens of the European Union' inscription.
'I am delighted that we will be reverting back to our blue colour which was changed when we all became citizens of the EU,' he told the paper.
The current European Union-approved burgundy document (pictured) was controversially introduced in 1988
The current European Union-approved burgundy document (pictured) was controversially introduced in 1988
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The cabinet minister added: 'We wanted to return to the dark blue passport because we recognise the string attachment people had to it.'
Tory MP Michael Fabricant said that the passports were going to have to be updated to remove the 'Citizens of the European Union' inscription.
'I am delighted that we will be reverting back to our blue colour which was changed when we all became citizens of the EU,' he told the paper.

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