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Wednesday, 17 September 2014

Incredible photos of the world's most dangerous walks to school

Determined: Students in Indonesia cling to steel bars on a broken bridge as they cross Ciherang River near their village in Lebak Regency. A pillar supporting one side of the crossing collapsed, leaving the wooden planks that acted as a path tilted to one side
If you thought your commute to work this morning was bad, take a look at the journey these children have to make each day to school.
From riding a zip wire over the Rio Negro in Colombia to clinging to the remains of a collapsed rope bridge in Indonesia, students have to be wide awake to navigate these precarious routes.
And if you moan about having to cram on to a packed train or bus each day, how about sharing a tiny horse cart with thirty five people, clinging to tyre tube while drifting down a river, or riding a donkey for five hours up a narrow mountain pass?
These startling images will make that stuffy, over-crowded train carriage look like a walk in the park...
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On the edge: This young child and his grandfather have to negotiate a narrow, rocky mountain pass on the way to a primary school in Sichuan province, China. The Gulu village's school is located halfway up the mountain and is the most remote in the world
On the edge: This young child and his grandfather have to negotiate a narrow, rocky mountain pass on the way to a primary school in Sichuan province, China. The Gulu village's school is located halfway up the mountain and is the most remote in the world
Rocky road: It takes Shen Qicai and his grandfather five hours to climb from the base of the mountain to the Gulu village primary school. Children must travel along a path that is just a couple of feet wide in some parts and has a sheer drop on one side down into the canyon below
Rocky road: It takes Shen Qicai and his grandfather five hours to climb from the base of the mountain to the Gulu village primary school. Children must travel along a path that is just a couple of feet wide in some parts and has a sheer drop on one side down into the canyon below
Determined: Students in Indonesia cling to steel bars on a broken bridge as they cross Ciherang River near their village in Lebak Regency. A pillar supporting one side of the crossing collapsed, leaving the wooden planks that acted as a path tilted to one side
Determined: Students in Indonesia cling to steel bars on a broken bridge as they cross Ciherang River near their village in Lebak Regency. A pillar supporting one side of the crossing collapsed, leaving the wooden planks that acted as a path tilted to one side
Mind the gap: A group of girls walk across a narrow plank on the walls of the 16th century Galle fort to reach their school in Sri Lanka
Mind the gap: A group of girls walk across a narrow plank on the walls of the 16th century Galle fort to reach their school in Sri Lanka
Don't look down! For most people, a zip wire is a novel thrill but for these villagers, it's part of their daily commute across the Rio Negro river in Colombia
Don't look down! For most people, a zip wire is a novel thrill but for these villagers, it's part of their daily commute across the Rio Negro river in Colombia
Taking the shortcut: For the handful of families living in the area 40 miles southeast of Colombia's capital Bogota, the wire is their only access to the outside world. It is 1,300ft above the Rio Negro and whizzes travellers across the river at 40mph to the opposite bank, half a mile away
Taking the shortcut: For the handful of families living in the area 40 miles southeast of Colombia's capital Bogota, the wire is their only access to the outside world. It is 1,300ft above the Rio Negro and whizzes travellers across the river at 40mph to the opposite bank, half a mile away
Clinging on for dear life: These two brave young boys have to use a tyre as a makeshift raft to travel to school along a river in Rizal Province in the Philippines
Clinging on for dear life: These two brave young boys have to use a tyre as a makeshift raft to travel to school along a river in Rizal Province in the Philippines
Children climb unsecured ladders to scale a mountain in Sangzhi County, Hunan province, China
Children climb unsecured ladders to scale a mountain in Sangzhi County, Hunan province, China
Children living in the Zhang Jiawan village, deep in the mountains in China's Hunan Province, have to climb unsecured ladders that are leaning against a 60-metre tall cliff face each day to get to school. The ladders are made by villagers and have to be replaced every three to five years. The alternative is a four-hour cross-country detour
Close to collapse: This bridge on the island of Sumatra was destroyed by heavy rain. The determined pupils from the Batu Busuk village who cross it every day then have to walk a further seven miles through dense forest to their school in the town of Padang
Close to collapse: This bridge on the island of Sumatra was destroyed by heavy rain. The determined pupils from the Batu Busuk village who cross it every day then have to walk a further seven miles through dense forest to their school in the town of Padang
These students from Cilangkap village had to construct a bamboo raft to get to school after a bridge across the Ciherang river in Indonesia's Lebak Regency collapsed
These students from Cilangkap village had to construct a bamboo raft to get to school after a bridge across the Ciherang river in Indonesia's Lebak Regency collapsed
Maximum capacity: A single horse cart ferries more than thirty-five children to school on the outskirts of New Delhi in India
Maximum capacity: A single horse cart ferries more than thirty-five children to school on the outskirts of New Delhi in India
A villager and her daughter attempt to cross a broken wooden bridge covered in snow in Dujiangyan, Sichuan Province, China
A villager and her daughter attempt to cross a broken wooden bridge covered in snow in Dujiangyan, Sichuan Province, China
Battling through a blizzard: A villager and her daughter attempt to cross a broken wooden bridge covered in snow in Sichuan Province, China. The bridge is the only connection to the outside world for people living in the Shawan village


Via - Dailymail.

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