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Friday, 26 October 2018

Saudi King 'will have Crown Prince REPLACED to restore the credibility of the monarchy' after his disastrous handling of the Khashoggi murder

Saudi King 'will have Crown Prince REPLACED to restore credibility'
Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (left) has faced claims he may have been behind the death of Jamal Khashoggi (inset) who went missing after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. Saudi Arabia first denied any role in the writer's disappearance before blaming his October 2 death on a botched attempt to return him to the kingdom. 

As the Crown Prince battles to contain the fallout from the killing, Saudi prosecutors said today that the murder was preplanned and suspects were being interrogated. According to Colonel Brian Lees, once the UK's defence attaché to Saudi Arabia and Yemen, the Crown Prince's days as de facto ruler are numbered and his father, King Salman (right), may now look to replace him following his disastrous handling of the case.


Saudi Arabia first denied any role in Khashoggi's disappearance before blaming his October 2 death on a botched attempt to return him to the kingdom.
On Thursday, Jamal Khashoggi's eldest son left Saudi Arabia for Washington DC with his family after a travel ban intended to lure the journalist home was lifted.   
It came as Saudi prosecutors said the murder was planned and suspects were being interrogated.
According to Colonel Brian Lees, once the UK's defence attaché to Saudi Arabia and Yemen, the Crown Prince's days as de facto ruler are numbered and his father, King Salman, may now look to replace him following his disastrous handling of the case. 
Saudi Arabia's King could have the Crown Prince replaced to restore the credibility of the monarchy amid turmoil over the Jamal Khashoggi murder, according to Britain's former defence attaché to the kingdom
Saudi Arabia's King could have the Crown Prince replaced to restore the credibility of the monarchy amid turmoil over the Jamal Khashoggi murder, according to Britain's former defence attaché to the kingdom
According to Colonel Brian Lees, once the UK's defence attaché to Saudi Arabia and Yemen, the Crown Prince's days as de facto ruler are numbered and his father, King Salman (pictured), may now look to replace him following his disastrous handling of the case
According to Colonel Brian Lees, once the UK's defence attaché to Saudi Arabia and Yemen, the Crown Prince's days as de facto ruler are numbered and his father, King Salman (pictured), may now look to replace him following his disastrous handling of the case
Saudi Arabia first denied any role in the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi (pictured) before blaming his October 2 death on a botched attempt to return him to the kingdom
Saudi Arabia first denied any role in the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi (pictured) before blaming his October 2 death on a botched attempt to return him to the kingdom
Colonel Lees, author of A Handbook of the Al Sa’ud Ruling Family of Saudi Arabia, told Rudaw: 'The Saudis will never admit that MbS (Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman) was culpable but this does not mean that he is in the clear. I believe that the king – assuming he is in one of his "clear" periods – will get rid of MbS by replacing him.
'He cannot do so immediately, or even in the next few months, because that would look like bowing to foreign pressure. He may use the already established device of using the special advisory council within the family to appoint a successor. This would certainly restore the credibility of the monarchy.'
Yesterday US President Donald Trump, in his toughest comments on the case yet, said the Crown Prince bore ultimate responsibility for the operation that led to the journalist's killing, piling pressure on his ally.
Critics suspect the royal ordered the high-profile operation or at least knew about it. 
But at an investment forum in Riyadh yesterday the defiant 33-year-old declared the murder a 'heinous crime that cannot be justified' and said Saudi Arabia was cooperating 'to bring the perpetrators to justice'.
It come days after it emerged that King Salman is now personally intervening in the Khashoggi case amid claims he had been kept in the dark about the crisis by his powerful son's aides.
The 82-year-old monarch has delegated vast powers to his son, essentially handing him the day-to-day running of the kingdom.
Via - Dailymail

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